Media Files
Title:
Interview with Haskell and Belle Friedman, October 31, 1981, Stoughton, Wisconsin
Collection:
Wisconsin Jewish Archives Oral Histories
Organization:
Wisconsin Historical Society
Description:
summary Susannah Starr interviews Haskell and Belle Friedman on October 31, 1981 in Stoughton, Wisconsin. Belle discusses her father's jobs as store owner, worker, newspaper stand owner. Belle also discusses the death of her mother during the Great Depression. Haskell talks about his father's saloon in Illinois, and buying a store with Belle in Stoughton. Belle and Haskell talk about Haskell's involvement in politics and their active roles in the social fabric of the community.
Identifier:
accession number WSA0146
Format:
audio
Description:
summary Susannah Starr interviews Haskell and Belle Friedman on October 31, 1981 in Stoughton, Wisconsin. Belle discusses her father's jobs as store owner, worker, newspaper stand owner. Belle also discusses the death of her mother during the Great Depression. Haskell talks about his father's saloon in Illinois, and buying a store with Belle in Stoughton. Belle and Haskell talk about Haskell's involvement in politics and their active roles in the social fabric of the community.
Language:
English
Date:
created 1981-10-31
Agent:
Interviewee Belle Friedman
Interviewer Susannah Starr
Rights Statement:
Copyright to this audio belongs to the Wisconsin Historical Society or, in certain cases, either to the individuals who created them or the organizations for which they worked. We share them here strictly for non-profit educational purposes. If you have questions related to the copyright status of material included here, please contact us at asklibrary@wisconsinhistory.org.
Publisher:
Wisconsin Historical Society
Duration:
01:09:38
Source Metadata URI:
00050266
Partial Transcript: Belle born in Janesville, WI on April 3, 1916. Father immigrated in 1908 and Mother in 1914. Belle lived in Jewish community in Rockford, Illinois until age 11, then moved to Chicago.
Partial Transcript: Belle and husband came to Stoughton and bought a store that had been owned by Jewish families.
Partial Transcript: Only four Jewish families living in Stoughton, and five Jewish children in the school system.
Partial Transcript: Father from Lithuania, about 30 when he immigrated to America. In America worked at his brother-in-law's scrap iron business to acquire enough money to bring Belle's mother and older siblings.
Partial Transcript: Belle's father and mother opened dry goods store in Rockford-had it for about 10 years, until mother got sick.
Partial Transcript: Father owned a newspaper stand in Chicago, other Jews owned stands as well.
Partial Transcript: Father worked seven days a week, mother sick
Partial Transcript: Belle's mother died, her father went to work in his brother's dry goods store
Partial Transcript: First job delivering newspapers, also worked as a bookkeeper for the Pepsi-Cola company (1935-1940) in Madison.
Partial Transcript: Belle came to Stoughton on July 1, 1950.
Partial Transcript: Father from Lithuania, came to Antigo, Wisconsin at age 14 and opened saloon in Kensington, Illinois. Haskell's mother born in Chicago.
Partial Transcript: Haskell's father opened saloon in Kensington, Illinois. Eventually opened one up in Chicago. Husky guy and felt suited for saloon ownership.
Partial Transcript: Haskell's father self educated, knew English and Polish. Did not go to night school.
Partial Transcript: Haskell's father opened his first saloon at 21 years old, raised funds through relatives.
Partial Transcript: Haskell did not live in Jewish neighborhood in Chicago, his father owned apartment building in non-Jewish neighborhood and they lived there.
Partial Transcript: Liked open spaces, and that inspired move to smaller city (Stoughton).
Partial Transcript: Separate entrances for women and families at Haskell's father's saloon.
Partial Transcript: Haskell's father not involved in politics
Partial Transcript: Friedman family took no vacations, opened a store, and worked really hard
Partial Transcript: Emergence of shopping centers changed the way the Friedman's ran their store
Partial Transcript: Friedman's felt well respected, invited to many events, their son won scholarships, their daughter won an award, did not feel community was anti-Semitic.
Partial Transcript: Haskell on hospital and library boards
Partial Transcript: Friendman's mingled in community with Jews and non-Jews, went to many events, ate non-kosher, volunteered at churches.
Partial Transcript: Haskell's city council position does not help business, owning a small business with big supermarkets around is very tough
Partial Transcript: Kosher food not sold in store, however ethnic food becoming more popular and it might have sold
Partial Transcript: Dealt with farmers often, farmers would come to store in work clothes and felt at home
Partial Transcript: Merchandise changed over the years, stopped selling house dresses, outdated shoe styles, and other discontinued products
Partial Transcript: Menswear, soft goods
No transcript available for this file.